6 Facts about the AJC Peachtree Road Race

Whether you're a participant, spectator or volunteer, the annual AJC Peachtree Road Race is a favorite tradition for visitors and Atlantans every July 4th. Here are six quick facts about this year's race. 
  • The AJC Peachtree Road Race is a Fourth of July tradition. (photo by Nelson Brackin)
    The AJC Peachtree Road Race is a Fourth of July tradition. (photo by Nelson Brackin)
  • The AJC Peachtree Road Race is the largest 10K in the world. (photo by Paul Kim)
    The AJC Peachtree Road Race is the largest 10K in the world. (photo by Paul Kim)
  • The AJC Peachtree Road Race finish line is a fun place to hang out. (photo by Tim Easterday)
    The AJC Peachtree Road Race finish line is a fun place to hang out. (photo by Tim Easterday)

Whether you're a participant, spectator or volunteer, the annual AJC Peachtree Road Race is a favorite tradition for visitors and Atlantans every July 4th. Here are six quick facts about this year's race.

  • Take Marta. 
    Event participants and spectators are strongly encouraged to take MARTA, which begins running at 5 a.m. on race day. It is a convenient and inexpensive way to travel to and from the AJC Peachtree Road Race. Runners are encouraged to use the Lenox station for the start and the Midtown or Arts Center station for the finish.

  • You can experience the race as a volunteer. 
    It takes the help of more than 3,500 volunteers to put on the AJC Peachtree Road Race. Volunteer registration for the 2015 AJC Peachtree Road Race is open. You can register as a volunteer for the Peachtree until 8 a.m. on July 3. 

  • It's not your typical race. 
    With 60,000 participants, the Peachtree Road Race is the world’s largest 10K. Those runners will burn approximately 36 million calories running the 6.2-mile course. 

  • The course offers great spots for spectators.
    One hundred and fifty thousand spectators line Peachtree Road to enjoy the world’s largest 10K for good reason: The course is loaded with great vantage points. At mile 2, at The Cathedral of St. Philip, you can see Dean Sam Candler sprinkle the runners with “holy water.” Or next to Piedmont Hospital, music plays as runners conquer Cardiac Hill. And it's always fun at the finish line in Piedmont Park at 10th Street. 

  • Shepherd Center’s wheelchair division leads off.
    This is considered one of the largest and fastest wheelchair 10Ks in the country. Beginning before the runners, the wheelchair division follows the same course set for the foot racers. On average, it takes racers approximately 2,500 pushes to complete the 6.2 miles of the Peachtree.

  • 2015 marks the 45th Peachtree Road Race. 
    On July 4, 1970, one hundred fifty runners gathered at the old Sears parking lot at the corner of Peachtree and Roswell roads. Of those, 110 completed the entire 6.2 mile-distance through Atlanta to Central City Park. The group, now known as the "Original 110," would go down in history as the first finishers of the inaugural Peachtree Road Race.

A former college golfer and sports reporter, Chris Kazakos brought with him a love for all sports when he moved to Atlanta from his native Florida Panhandle in 2006. Today he is an ardent follower of all major Atlanta sports teams and events. Besides local sports venues and golf courses, you can find Kazakos at one of the many restaurants, concerts, museums and festivals this great city has to offer. Follow Kazakos on Twitter and Instagram @ChrisKazakos.

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